American Silversmiths

Henry Marquand
(1737-1772)
Lucretia Jennings
(1737-)
Jesse Dimond
(1771-1822)
Bethia Marquand
(1769-1842)
picture
Isaac Marquand Dimond
(1804-1862)

 

Family Links

Isaac Marquand Dimond
  • Born: 24 Feb 1804, Fairfield CT
  • Died: 16 Dec 1862, Brooklyn NY

  General notes:

Silversmith

  Events in his life were:

  • ,, . He attended the academy at Fairfield CT, where he prepared himself for Yale College. Upon the death of his father -- after having been burned out in an enterprise he had undertaken in the South -- he went to New York City, where he was apprenticed to a silversmith who did everything in his power to prevent Isaac from learning the trade, being jealous of Isaac's uncle Isaac Marquand's influence. Mr. Marquand at that time controlled the largest retail jewelry trade in the city.
    Having finished his apprenticeship without any particular knowledge of the business, owing to the peculiar situation in which he had been placed, Isaac made arrangements to remain one year as a journeyman, with wages and the privilege of using the tools after the day's work was done and gathering the dust from the floors of the work-rooms, from which he procured enough silver to complete a set of spoons for his mother. At the end of the year he had $1,000 in bank and, what was more, a knowledge of his trade.
    He succeeded in obtaining better terms from his employer for the next two years, during which time, by strict economy and the proceeds from the invention of some labor-saving machinery--the first used in the silver trade--he had saved enough to lease the establishment for a year, and at the end of that time he bought it outright and hired his old employer as a workman. His success as a manufacturing jeweler and silversmith was phenomenal. After some years he retired from active business and transferred his capital into real estate, and was then considered one of the wealthiest men in the city. Unfortunately, having endorsed largely for some young men who speculated in real estate, and to save himself from their obligations during the financial crisis of 1840 and 1841, he took advantage of the Bankrupt Act, and gave up all he possessed.

  • He worked in 1828-1830 as a silversmith in New York City NY
    A member, in 1832, of the General Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen of New York City. 18
  • He was a partner in 1831-1832 with Benjamin Gurnee in New York City NY as DIMOND & GURNEE. 18
  • He worked after 1832 as a silversmith in New York City NY
    Listed in Longworth's 1834 city directory at 2 Green Street.
  • He appeared on the 1850 census taken at Windsor, Eaton, MI, listed as a farmer.



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